Every Child Deserves a Great Education
Home

Common Core at the Learning Store?

Posted on May 19, 2015 by dmayer

So I walk into the learning store to see what’s available for parents to purchase in their attempt to assuage the dreaded Common Core beast that has entered into the lives of their children, uninvited. As a teacher I had frequented the store and spent considerable time and way too much of my paycheck there. As a retired teacher, I sometimes buy games and flashcards to tutor struggling students. I have to admit it. The #2 Ticonderogas, the scented fluorescent markers, legos, scores of smiley-face stickers, laminated posters hot off the press, paints and puzzles, more legos . . . I love that store.

 photo 7e72c7ee-12e8-4f62-b481-826233ad04d5_zpsf0h1f0xy.jpg

I chat with the sales clerk. I want to know about how parent resources have changed since Common Core State Standards and high stakes testing have become the driving force in our public schools. I refer to Arne Duncan’s assessment of suburban moms, the very parents who frequent her store:

It turns out that many suburban and middle-class parents have issues when those reforms are extended to the schools that educate their children. This has been taken as a sign that these parents are ignorant or selfish. As U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has put it, “Pushback is coming from, sort of, white suburban moms who – all of a sudden – their child isn’t as brilliant as they thought they were and their school isn’t quite as good as they thought they were, and that’s pretty scary.”

I offer up some more facts about the test, and she listens patiently. “Although some parents are beginning to opt-out their children from high stakes standardized tests, others are hunkering down for the challenge believing that their children will defiantly beat the odds — as only one-third of students are predicted to pass the SBAC or PARCC,” I explain. She nods and sighs deeply.

“Parents come in and ask for books to help their kids with Common Core and the tests, and I direct them to these shelves,” she says as she gestures. She directs me to shelves of books displaying  Common Core icons on the cover. I browse the math selection.

 photo 5681cafb-9433-4fb9-a825-f095b8f9898f_zpswbe0wtfu.jpg

 photo 773848f1-6b95-49a4-a2da-ac0b690bca5e_zpsx1efg7rx.jpg

 photo a62967c3-34d5-4e44-9322-cdcf8cf61e28_zpskgsmi2ok.jpg

I expect to find booklets rich in worksheets and answer keys delineating the 108 steps required to solve a Common Core fourth grade word problem as demonstrated by this Arkansas mom.

Instead I find the same standard content from the same familiar publishers. There are no convoluted word problems with 108 steps that can just as easily be calculated in two.  Confused, I ask the sales clerk what had changed in the new booklets the store is now selling as Common Core material.

She grins sheepishly, shrugs a little, and says, “The Common Core icon on the cover.”  She timidly bites her lip and hurries away to help other customers offering no further explanation.

I get it. This store isn’t in the business of selling out kids by providing the ridiculous CCSS resources that make a mockery of learning. They aren’t betraying families with children who need a little boost to learn math. On the other hand, it’s deceptive to market math materials as Common Core relevant when clearly they are not. It must confuse parents who are trying to figure out what all the fuss is about.  They miss the opportunity to find out just how convoluted Common Core math really is.

Immediately, I see the predicament the store had been forced into by an education system that no longer makes sense. Selling education materials should not present a moral dilemma to shop keepers promoting the joy of learning. UGH!

 photo c3423d28-d816-40c8-a4db-24da6693cf41_zpsgcxkre65.jpg

Be Sociable, Share!

Leave a Reply


− one = 2